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The FDA Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), signed into law by President Obama on Jan. 4, 2011 enables FDA to better protect public health by strengthening the food safety system. It enables FDA to focus more on preventing food safety problems rather than relying primarily on reacting to problems after they occur. The law also provides FDA with new enforcement authorities designed to achieve higher rates of compliance with prevention- and risk-based food safety standards and to better respond to and contain problems when they do occur.  

Read more details at: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/ucm239907.htm

and full details on the new Act and its implementation on the FDA website: http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/FSMA/default.htm

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BEUC Report : Dishonest Labelling Still an Issue

BEUC’s latest report found croquettes containing half the quantity of meat declared on the label, sulphites used to make minced beef look fresher, and chicken sold as veal in kebabs.

Read more: http://horsetalk.co.nz/2015/11/06/dishonest-food-labelling-still-issue-europe-report/#ixzz3r5W0EpLS 

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Following a study of Manuka honey, Rowse Honey has concluded that more than twice as much Manuka honey is sold than produced. In addition, Rowse funded tests on the NPA value, which is an indication of the amount of methyl glyoxal, the active compound giving the honey its antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties.  The tests showed that in many cases the the NPA value did not match the amount of methyl glyoxal that should have been present.

Read the full article at :

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3302734/It-s-honey-trap-Half-liquid-gold-manuka-sold-high-street-fake-experts-warn.html

 

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A rapid multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mass spectrometric method for the detection and relative quantitation of the adulteration of meat with that of an undeclared species is presented by IFR's Analytical Sciences Unit. The approach uses corresponding proteins from the different species under investigation and corresponding peptides from those proteins, or CPCP. Selected peptide markers can be used for species detection. The use of ratios of MRM transition peak areas for corresponding peptides is proposed for relative quantitation. The approach is introduced by use of myoglobin from four meats: beef, pork, horse and lamb. Focusing in the present work on species identification, by use of predictive tools, peptide markers were determined that allow the identification of all four meats and detection of one meat added to another at levels of 1% (w/w). Candidate corresponding peptide pairs to be used for the relative quantification of one meat added to another have been observed. Preliminary quantitation data presented here are encouraging.

Read the full article in Anal. Chem.201587 (20), pp 10315–10322  at

http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021%2Facs.analchem.5b02318

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A lab-on-a-chip-based multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the authentication of five non-halal meat species in foods is described. Using species-specific primers, 172, 163, 141, 129 and 108-bp sites of mitochondrial ND5, ATPase 6 andcytochrome b genes were amplified to detect cat, dog, pig, monkey and rat species under complex matrices. Species-specificity was authenticated against 20 different species with the potential to be used in food. The assay was optimised under the backgrounds of various commercial meat products and validated for the analysis of meatballs, burgers and frankfurters, which are popular fast food items across the globe. The assay was tested to detect 0.1% suspected meats under commercial backgrounds of marketed foods.

Read more in Food Additives and Contaminants at: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/19440049.2015.1087060

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A method using the q-ICP-MS analysis of 19 elements has been developed to differentiate organic and conventional Brazilian rice samples. 17 certified organic samples and 33 conventionally grown rice samples from 5 different regions in Brazil were analysed, and using 19 elements it was possible to predict with 98% confidence the authenticity of the rice samples. Just using calcium and cadmium, it was possible to predict the authenticity with 96% confidence.

Read the full preliminary unedited pdf paper at:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889157515002008 

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Major food adulteration and contamination events occur with alarming regularity and are known to be episodic, with the question being not if but when another large-scale food safety/integrity incident will occur. Indeed, the challenges of maintaining food security are now internationally recognised. The ever increasing scale and complexity of food supply networks can lead to them becoming significantly more vulnerable to fraud and contamination, and potentially dysfunctional. This can make the task of deciding which analytical methods are more suitable to collect and analyse (bio)chemical data within complex food supply chains, at targeted points of vulnerability, that much more challenging. It is evident that those working within and associated with the food industry are seeking rapid, user-friendly methods to detect food fraud and contamination, and rapid/high-throughput screening methods for the analysis of food in general. In addition to being robust and reproducible, these methods should be portable and ideally handheld and/or remote sensor devices, that can be taken to or be positioned on/at-line at points of vulnerability along complex food supply networks and require a minimum amount of background training to acquire information rich data rapidly (ergo point-and-shoot). Here we briefly discuss a range of spectrometry and spectroscopy based approaches, many of which are commercially available, as well as other methods currently under development. We discuss a future perspective of how this range of detection methods in the growing sensor portfolio, along with developments in computational and information sciences such as predictive computing and the Internet of Things, will together form systems- and technology-based approaches that significantly reduce the areas of vulnerability to food crime within food supply chains. As food fraud is a problem of systems and therefore requires systems level solutions and thinking.

http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2015/ay/c5ay02048d

D.I. EllisH.MuhamadaliS.A. HaugheyC.T. Elliott and R. Goodacre,  Analytical Methods

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Elemental iodine determination by ICP-MS and carbon isotope analysis by EA-IRMS were jointly employed to identify recycled cooking oil from edible oils. Iodine in 204 oils demonstrated that recycled cooking oils can be distinguished from soybean oil, maize oil, rapeseed oil, groundnut oil, sunflower oil and olive oil. It is proposed to use total iodine analysis as the primary screening method and the carbon isotope ratio measurement as a secondary method for confirmation and verification.

Read the full abstract at: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11746-015-2726-0

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Detecting Food Authenticity and Integrity

Detecting Food Authenticity and Integrity is a joint Analyst and Analytical Methods themed collection of research papers showcasing the latest discoveries and developments in detecting food authenticity and integrity; including the analysis and detection of food fraud, contamination, adulteration and spoilage. There are papers on:

  1. A new PCR method for horsemeat detection and quantification.
  2. Rapid quantitative detection methods for rapid on-site food fraud analysis - moving out of the laboratory and into the food supply chain.
  3. Assessment for the fitness of purpose utilisation of 5 hydroxymethyl 2 furfural quantification analysis in FAPAS proficiency tests.
  4. Hyperspectral imaging in tandem with multivariant analysis and image processing for non-invasive detection and visualisation of pork adulteration in minced beef.
  5. Integration of colorimetric and SERS detection for rapid screening and validation of melamine in milk.

The papers are available from the on-line journals at:

 http://pubs.rsc.org/en/journals/articlecollectionlanding?sercode=ay&themeid=dd305f52-68e5-44e6-8634-25d564d11c89


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Fungal Stripe Rust Threatens Global Wheat Supply

A new study from the University of Minnesota shows that stripe rust is an even greater threat to the world’s wheat supply than previously thought. Stripe rust is caused by a fungus and produces bright yellow spores. According to the US Department of Agriculture, it’s common for a field infected with stripe rust to lose 40 percent of its wheat, and sometimes fields are wiped out completely.

Read more at:  http://kstp.com/article/stories/s3909251.shtml

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Each year fake food products and tobacco smuggling cost the legal market four billion euros and over 20,000 jobs in Italy, according to Confagricoltura at the Milan Expo 2015. 

Read more at: http://www.ansamed.info/ansamed/en/news/sections/sicily_expo_2015/2015/09/09/food-counterfeiting-cost-4bln-a-year_fc154ff0-391b-44e2-9292-0976dfc3255a.html

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M&S Reveals Unannounced Food Audits

Marks & Spencer is combining its hygiene and product audits and preparing to roll out unannounced visits to the majority of its food suppliers in a bid to further strengthen its supply chain integrity against fraudsters looking to cash in on vulnerable companies.

Read more the full article:

http://www.foodmanufacture.co.uk/Manufacturing/Retailer-s-plan-to-tackle-food-fraud

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NFU Scotland reported that several farmers have been in touch in recent days about the deteriorating conditions for harvest - and the wider troubles of poor returns and high input costs. One area already suffering is the west of Scotland, where for many cereal growers the misery is getting worse by the day, with very little let up in the downpours that have been turning fields into swamps.

Read the full article at:

http://www.thescottishfarmer.co.uk/news/catastrophic-harvest-looms.27616768

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Olive Oil Hits Highest Price in A Decade

Commodity prices for virgin olive oil reached €4,099.52 ($4,615) per tonne last week, up more than 60% from a year earlier, according to Spanish industry group La Fundación para la Promoción y el Desarrollo del Olivar. Global retail prices have risen about 10% in the last 12 months, Euromonitor research shows. 
“The main reason is a key supply issue, which happened simultaneously in the two most important countries – Spain and Italy,” said Vito Martielli, analyst at Rabobank. Crop-damaging droughts last summer shrank the Spanish harvest to 835,000 tonnes, less than half the prior season’s bumper crop of 1.78mn tonnes. In Italy, traditionally the world’s No 2 producer, insect-borne bacteria destroyed swaths of olive groves in the southeast and cut production by more than 50% to 222,000 tonnes. 
Global production for 2014/15 dropped by 29%, figures from the International Olive Council (IOC) show, helping to push olive oil’s commodity price to its highest since February 2006.

Read more at:

http://www.gulf-times.com/eco.-bus.%20news/256/details/452128/olive-oil-hits-highest-in-nearly-a-decade

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